Is Music Similar Across Cultures?

2019-12-01

00:00 / 00:00
复读宝 RABC v8.0beta 复读机按钮使用说明
播放/暂停
停止
播放时:倒退3秒/复读时:回退AB段
播放时:快进3秒/复读时:前进AB段
拖动:改变速度/点击:恢复正常速度1.0
拖动改变复读暂停时间
点击:复读最近5秒/拖动:改变复读次数
设置A点
设置B点
取消复读并清除AB点
播放一行
停止播放
后退一行
前进一行
复读一行
复读多行
变速复读一行
变速复读多行
LRC
TXT
大字
小字
滚动
全页
1
  • Love songs, dance tunes, bed time songs for children - all of these kinds of music share patterns across cultures, a new study finds.
  • 2
  • Researchers who set up the study say this suggests a commonality in the way human minds create music.
  • 3
  • The findings were reported in Science magazine.
  • 4
  • Samuel Mehr was the lead author of a report on the study.
  • 5
  • He is a research associate in psychology at Harvard University in Massachusetts.
  • 6
  • Mehr noted that the study supports "the idea that there is some sort of set of governing rules for how human minds produce music worldwide."
  • 7
  • He and other researchers studied musical recordings and ethnographic records from 60 societies around the world.
  • 8
  • They looked at a mix of very different cultures, such as the Highland Scots in Scotland, Nyangatom nomads in Ethiopia, and Aranda hunter-gatherers in Australia.
  • 9
  • The researchers found that music had a link with behaviors such as dancing and loving, among others.
  • 10
  • Manvir Singh is a graduate student in Harvard's department of human evolutionary biology and a co-author of the study.
  • 11
  • Singh noted that childrens' lullabies were likely to be slow and fluid while dance songs tended to be fast and lively.
  • 12
  • Another co-author of the study was Luke Glowacki, an anthropology professor at the Pennsylvania State University.
  • 13
  • He noted that the social purpose of the music influences how it sounds.
  • 14
  • He said: "Dance songs sound a certain way around the world because they have a specific function. Lullabies around the world sound a certain way because they have a specific function ... If music were entirely shaped by culture and not human psychology you wouldn't expect these deep similarities to emerge in extremely diverse cultures."
  • 15
  • Glowacki noted how amazing the musical patterns across cultures were.
  • 16
  • He said: "The fact that a lullaby, healing song or dance song from the British Isles or anywhere else in the world has many musical features in common with the same kind of song from hunter-gatherers in Australia or horticulturalists in Africa is remarkable."
  • 17
  • I'm Jonathan Evans.
  • 1
  • Love songs, dance tunes, bed time songs for children - all of these kinds of music share patterns across cultures, a new study finds. Researchers who set up the study say this suggests a commonality in the way human minds create music.
  • 2
  • The findings were reported in Science magazine.
  • 3
  • Samuel Mehr was the lead author of a report on the study. He is a research associate in psychology at Harvard University in Massachusetts.
  • 4
  • Mehr noted that the study supports "the idea that there is some sort of set of governing rules for how human minds produce music worldwide."
  • 5
  • He and other researchers studied musical recordings and ethnographic records from 60 societies around the world. They looked at a mix of very different cultures, such as the Highland Scots in Scotland, Nyangatom nomads in Ethiopia, and Aranda hunter-gatherers in Australia.
  • 6
  • The researchers found that music had a link with behaviors such as dancing and loving, among others.
  • 7
  • Manvir Singh is a graduate student in Harvard's department of human evolutionary biology and a co-author of the study. Singh noted that childrens' lullabies were likely to be slow and fluid while dance songs tended to be fast and lively.
  • 8
  • Another co-author of the study was Luke Glowacki, an anthropology professor at the Pennsylvania State University. He noted that the social purpose of the music influences how it sounds.
  • 9
  • He said: "Dance songs sound a certain way around the world because they have a specific function. Lullabies around the world sound a certain way because they have a specific function ... If music were entirely shaped by culture and not human psychology you wouldn't expect these deep similarities to emerge in extremely diverse cultures."
  • 10
  • Glowacki noted how amazing the musical patterns across cultures were.
  • 11
  • He said: "The fact that a lullaby, healing song or dance song from the British Isles or anywhere else in the world has many musical features in common with the same kind of song from hunter-gatherers in Australia or horticulturalists in Africa is remarkable."
  • 12
  • I'm Jonathan Evans.
  • 13
  • Will Dunham reported on this story for Reuters. John Russell adapted it for Learning English. George Grow was the editor.
  • 14
  • ________________________________________________________________
  • 15
  • Words in This Story
  • 16
  • pattern - n. the regular and repeated way in which something happens or is done
  • 17
  • author - n. a writer of a book or report
  • 18
  • ethnographic - adj. from the noun ethnography, the study of human races and cultures
  • 19
  • graduate student - n. a person who has successfully completed a bachelor's degree and is continuing their studies
  • 20
  • lullaby - n. a song used to help a child fall asleep
  • 21
  • function - n. the special purpose or activity for which a thing exists or is used
  • 22
  • amazing - adj. of or involving great surprise or wonder
  • 23
  • feature - n. a quality or property of something
  • 24
  • horticulturalist -- n. people or scientists who grow fruits, vegetables, and flowers
  • 25
  • We want to hear from you. Write to us in the Comments Section.