While You Sleep, Your Brain Works

08/20/2014

00:00 / 00:00
复读宝 RABC v8.0beta 复读机按钮使用说明
播放/暂停
停止
播放时:倒退3秒/复读时:回退AB段
播放时:快进3秒/复读时:前进AB段
拖动:改变速度/点击:恢复正常速度1.0
拖动改变复读暂停时间
点击:复读最近5秒/拖动:改变复读次数
设置A点
设置B点
取消复读并清除AB点
播放一行
停止播放
后退一行
前进一行
复读一行
复读多行
变速复读一行
变速复读多行
LRC
TXT
大字
小字
滚动
全页
1
  • From VOA Learning English, this is the Health Report.
  • 2
  • Why do we need sleep?
  • 3
  • Is bedtime just a time for dreaming?
  • 4
  • Do our brains turn off for the night?
  • 5
  • What if I told you that scientists recently discovered
  • 6
  • that our brains may be just as busy at night as they are during the day?
  • 7
  • While we sleep, our brains are doing much more than getting ready for the next day.
  • 8
  • Researchers at the University of Rochester found that the brain may be busy cleaning house --
  • 9
  • cleaning out harmful waste materials.
  • 10
  • As with many studies, the researchers turned to mice for help.
  • 11
  • They studied mice that had colored dye injected into their brains.
  • 12
  • They observed the mice brains as they slept and when they were awake.
  • 13
  • The researchers say they saw that the brains of sleeping mice were hard at work.
  • 14
  • Dr. Maiken Nedergaard led the study.The brain expert says our brains perform two very different jobs.
  • 15
  • It seems they have daytime jobs.Later they "moonlight" at a nighttime job.
  • 16
  • "Moonlighting" is working a nighttime job in addition to a day job.
  • 17
  • And this study says that is what our brains seem to be doing -
  • 18
  • working an extra job at night without additional pay for overtime.
  • 19
  • "When we are awake, the brain cells are working very hard at processing all the information about our surroundings.
  • 20
  • Whereas when we are asleep, they work very, very hard at removing all the waste that builds up when we are awake."
  • 21
  • The researchers say that the waste material includes poisons,
  • 22
  • or toxins, responsible for brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.
  • 23
  • They also found that during sleep, the brain's cells shrink, or become smaller.
  • 24
  • This shrinking permits waste to be removed more effectively.
  • 25
  • Dr. Nedergaard says these toxins end up in the liver.
  • 26
  • There, they are broken down and then removed from the body.
  • 27
  • "So our study suggests we need to sleep because we have a macroscopic cleaning system
  • 28
  • that removes many of the toxic waste products from the brain."
  • 29
  • The brain's cleaning system could only be studied with new imaging technologies.
  • 30
  • The test animal must be alive in order to see for this brain process to be seen as it happens.
  • 31
  • Dr. Nedergaard says the next step is to look for the process in human brains.
  • 32
  • She said the results demonstrate just how important sleep is to health and fighting disease.
  • 33
  • The research may also one day lead to treatments to prevent or help fight neurological disorders.
  • 34
  • Do you have trouble sleepingNot being able to sleep is called insomnia.
  • 35
  • According to the United States National Sleep Foundation,
  • 36
  • here are some tips for a good night's sleep: (7 Tips for Better Sleeping)
  • 37
  • Go to bed about the same time each night, even on weekends.
  • 38
  • This helps to "set" your body's "sleep clock."
  • 39
  • Exercise every day.
  • 40
  • Have a calm, relaxing bedtime routine -
  • 41
  • Take a warm bath or drink a hot cup of tea.
  • 42
  • Try not to take long naps during the day.
  • 43
  • Periods of sleep during the daytime can interfere with sleep at night.
  • 44
  • Make sure you have a pleasant environment where you sleep.
  • 45
  • For most people, a cool, quiet and dark room is best for sleeping.
  • 46
  • Avoid using television, computers and other electronic screens before bedtime.
  • 47
  • Also avoid alcohol, cigarettes and heavy meals before bedtime.
  • 48
  • And from VOA Learning English, that's the Health Report.I'm Anna Matteo.
  • 1
  • From VOA Learning English, this is the Health Report.
  • 2
  • Why do we need sleep?
  • 3
  • Is bedtime just a time for dreaming? Do our brains turn off for the night? What if I told you that scientists recently discovered that our brains may be just as busy at night as they are during the day?
  • 4
  • While we sleep, our brains are doing much more than getting ready for the next day.Researchers at the University of Rochester found that the brain may be busy cleaning house -- cleaning out harmful waste materials.
  • 5
  • As with many studies, the researchers turned to mice for help.They studied mice that had colored dye injected into their brains. They observed the mice brains as they slept and when they were awake.The researchers say they saw that the brains of sleeping mice were hard at work.
  • 6
  • Working Double Duty
  • 7
  • Dr. Maiken Nedergaard led the study.The brain expert says our brains perform two very different jobs.It seems they have daytime jobs.Later they "moonlight" at a nighttime job.
  • 8
  • "Moonlighting" is working a nighttime job in addition to a day job.And this study says that is what our brains seem to be doing - working an extra job at night without additional pay for overtime.
  • 9
  • "When we are awake, the brain cells are working very hard at processing all the information about our surroundings. Whereas when we are asleep, they work very, very hard at removing all the waste that builds up when we are awake."
  • 10
  • The researchers say that the waste material includes poisons, or toxins, responsible for brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.
  • 11
  • They also found that during sleep, the brain's cells shrink, or become smaller.This shrinking permits waste to be removed more effectively.
  • 12
  • Dr. Nedergaard says these toxins end up in the liver.There, they are broken down and then removed from the body.
  • 13
  • "So our study suggests we need to sleep because we have a macroscopic cleaning system that removes many of the toxic waste products from the brain."
  • 14
  • The brain's cleaning system could only be studied with new imaging technologies.The test animal must be alive in order to see for this brain process to be seen as it happens.
  • 15
  • Dr. Nedergaard says the next step is to look for the process in human brains.She said the results demonstrate just how important sleep is to health and fighting disease.The research may also one day lead to treatments to prevent or help fight neurological disorders.
  • 16
  • 7 Tips for Better Sleeping
  • 17
  • Do you have trouble sleepingNot being able to sleep is called insomnia.According to the United States National Sleep Foundation, here are some tips for a good night's sleep:
  • 18
  • Go to bed about the same time each night, even on weekends.This helps to "set" your body's "sleep clock."
  • 19
  • Exercise every day.
  • 20
  • Have a calm, relaxing bedtime routine - Take a warm bath or drink a hot cup of tea.
  • 21
  • Try not to take long naps during the day.Periods of sleep during the daytime can interfere with sleep at night.
  • 22
  • Make sure you have a pleasant environment where you sleep.For most people, a cool, quiet and dark room is best for sleeping.
  • 23
  • Avoid using television, computers and other electronic screens before bedtime.
  • 24
  • Also avoid alcohol, cigarettes and heavy meals before bedtime.
  • 25
  • And from VOA Learning English, that's the Health Report.I'm Anna Matteo.